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WSJ Op Ed Calls for Reinvigoration of "Shop Class" Education Offerings

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An April 24 opinion column written by Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel calls for a reinvestment and focus on career and technical education. The article is titled "Welders Make $150,000? Bring Back Shop Class" and subtitled "Taking pride in learning to make and build things can begin in high school. Plenty of jobs await."

Mr. Mandel states:

Too many young people have four-year liberal-arts degrees, are thousands of dollars in debt and find themselves serving coffee at  Starbucks or working part-time at the mall. Many of them would have been better off with a two-year skilled-trade or technical education that provides the skills to secure a well-paying job.

Visit The Wall Street Journal website to read the complete article. (Subscription may be required.)

Last Updated on Tuesday, 22 April 2014 08:55
 

Moneynews: College Degree No Longer the Solution to Good Jobs

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Moneynews article: College Degree No Longer the Solution to Good Jobs

Thursday, January 23, 2014 06:54 AM

By: Neal Asbury

More than 40 percent of recent U.S. college graduates are unemployed, underemployed or need more training to get on a career track, according to a poll released last year by global management consulting firm Accenture.

The online survey of 1,050 workers who finished school in the previous two years and 1,010 who received their degree in 2013 also found that many graduates, some heavily in debt because of the cost of their education, say they are in jobs that do not require a college degree. In fact, just 53 percent of the graduates found full-time jobs in their field of study.

[Check out the rest of the article at Moneynews.]

 

Mike Rowe Interview

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"If we are lending money that ostensibly we don't have to kids who have no hope of making it back in order to train them for jobs that clearly don't exist, I might suggest that we've gone around the bend a little bit," says TV personality Mike Rowe, best known as the longtime host of Discovery Channel's Dirty Jobs.

"There is a real disconnect in the way that we educate vis-a-vis the opportunities that are available. You have - right now - about 3 million jobs that can't be filled," he says, talking about openings in traditional trades ranging from construction to welding to plumbing. "Jobs that typically parents' don't sit down with their kids and say, 'Look, if all goes well, this is what you are going to do.'"

Rowe, who once sang for the Baltimore Opera and worked as an on-air pitchman for QVC, worries that traditional K-12 education demonizes blue-collar fields that pay well and are begging for workers while insisting that everyone get a college degree. He stresses that he's "got nothing against college" but believes it's a huge mistake to push everyone in the same direction regardless of interest or ability. Between Mike Rowe Foundation and Profoundly Disconnected, a venture between Rowe and the heavy equipment manufacturer Caterpillar, Rowe is hoping both to help people find new careers and publicize what he calls "the diploma dilemma."

Rowe recently sat down with Reason TV's Nick Gillespie to discuss his bad experience with a high school guidance counselor (3:20), why he provides scholarships based on work ethic (6:57), the problem with taxpayer-supported college loans (8:40), why America demonizes dirty jobs (11:32), the happiest day of his life (13:14), why following your passion is terrible advice (17:05), why it's so hard to hire good people (21:04), the hidden cost of regulatory compliance (23:16), the problem with Obama's promise to create shovel ready jobs (33:05), efficiency versus effectiveness (34:17), and life after Dirty Jobs (38:24).

You can check out the entire 41-minute-long interview here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzKzu86Agg0. Visit http://reason.com/reasontv/2013/12/13... for full text, links, and downloadable versions of the video.

 

NYT Article Highlights German-model Apprenticeship in SC

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Where Factory Apprenticeship Is Latest Model From Germany

GREER, S.C. — For Joerg Klisch, hiring the first 60 workers to build heavy engines at his company’s new factory in South Carolina was easy. Finding the next 60 was not so simple.

“It seemed like we had sucked up everybody who knew about diesel engines,” said Mr. Klisch, vice president for North American operations of Tognum America. “It wasn’t working as we had planned.”

So Mr. Klisch did what he would have done back home in Germany: He set out to train them himself. Working with five local high schools and a career center in Aiken County, S.C. — and a curriculum nearly identical to the one at the company’s headquarters in Friedrichshafen — Tognum now has nine juniors and seniors enrolled in its apprenticeship program.

Inspired by a partnership between schools and industry that is seen as a key to Germany’s advanced industrial capability and relatively low unemployment rate, projects like the one at Tognum are practically unheard-of in the United States.

But experts in government and academia, along with those inside companies like BMW, which has its only American factory in South Carolina, say apprenticeships are a desperately needed option for younger workers who want decent-paying jobs, or increasingly, any job at all. And without more programs like the one at Tognum, they maintain, the nascent recovery in American manufacturing will run out of steam for lack of qualified workers.

For the rest of the article at the New York TImes website, click here.

 

High Heels and Hard Hats Article Spotlights Women in Construction Jobs

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It's becoming increasingly easier to find positive female role models in the apprenticeable trades, including in the media. For a great article focusing on women in the construction industry, check out High Heels and Hard Hats from the Jan/Feb 2013 issue of Constructor magazine!

 
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Page 1 of 5

Events

MEATA 2014 Spring Apprenticeship Conference
Begin: 05-21-2014, 15:00
End: 05-23-2014, 12:00
Location: Motor City Casino Hotel , 2901 Grand River Ave, Detroit, MI 48201, and the, UAW-Ford Technical Training Center , 25500 Outer Drive, Lincoln Park, MI 48146
Theme: Passing the Skills Torch Forward!


more ...

Apprenticeship Trivia

Efforts in the U.S. to create a uniform national apprenticeship system began in the 1920s during the boom days following WWI. At that time, immigration was heavily restricted, so fewer skilled workers came to the U.S. from other countries at a time when industry, especially the construction trades, needed more skilled labor than was available. These efforts would not come to fruition until 1934, in large part due to the crash of 1929 and the ensuing Great Depression.